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Título: Los hijos del Califato © Noor
 
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ID:CON_01465432Referencia Original:KOY2017003C-0047.jpgAutor:Yuri Kozyrev / NOOROrigen:NoorCopyright:2017 © Yuri Kozyrev / NOOR / CONTACTOPie de Imagen:Russia, Chechnya, Grozny, 13 November 2017 A crowd of aunts, uncles, grandparents and cousins are among those who come out at the airport in Grozny to meet the aircraft from Syria. More than 40 women and children rescued from conflict zones in Syria have been airlifted to Grozny, Chechnya. The people that arrived in Chechnya are natives of Russia’s republics of Bashkortostan, Dagestan and Chechnya, the city of Oryol as well as nationals of Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. This is the biggest group evacuated in similar operations so far. Meeting them at the airport were relatives, local officials and families whose children still stay in countries of the Middle East. Despite the stigma associated with having a male relative leave to fight for ISIS, as soon as reports began emerging of Russian children running loose on the streets of Mosul, the grandmothers of Grozny started speaking out. Kadyrov’s support of the rescue missions has no doubt removed some of the fear for the women. Nonetheless, they could still face repercussions or retribution from others in their community. In places such as Grozny, the capital of Chechnya, there’s now an emotional search effort to locate the children left behind in the war zone. In republics such as Chechnya, Dagestan and other mountainous Caucasus regions, up to 2,500 Muslim men — many of them battle-hardened from years of fighting guerrilla insurgencies — left to join the ranks of ISIS. And many forced their unwitting wives and children to follow them. Yuri Kozyrev / NOOR
ID:CON_01465430Referencia Original:KOY2017003C-0045.jpgAutor:Yuri Kozyrev / NOOROrigen:NoorCopyright:2017 © Yuri Kozyrev / NOOR / CONTACTOPie de Imagen:Russia, Chechnya, Grozny, 13 November 2017 A crowd of aunts, uncles, grandparents and cousins are among those who come out at the airport in Grozny to meet the aircraft from Syria. More than 40 women and children rescued from conflict zones in Syria have been airlifted to Grozny, Chechnya. The people that arrived in Chechnya are natives of Russia’s republics of Bashkortostan, Dagestan and Chechnya, the city of Oryol as well as nationals of Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. This is the biggest group evacuated in similar operations so far. Meeting them at the airport were relatives, local officials and families whose children still stay in countries of the Middle East. Despite the stigma associated with having a male relative leave to fight for ISIS, as soon as reports began emerging of Russian children running loose on the streets of Mosul, the grandmothers of Grozny started speaking out. Kadyrov’s support of the rescue missions has no doubt removed some of the fear for the women. Nonetheless, they could still face repercussions or retribution from others in their community. In places such as Grozny, the capital of Chechnya, there’s now an emotional search effort to locate the children left behind in the war zone. In republics such as Chechnya, Dagestan and other mountainous Caucasus regions, up to 2,500 Muslim men — many of them battle-hardened from years of fighting guerrilla insurgencies — left to join the ranks of ISIS. And many forced their unwitting wives and children to follow them. Yuri Kozyrev / NOOR