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Título: Made in Etiopía: El despegar industrial del pais africano © Nichole Sobecki / VII
 
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ID:CON_01524725Referencia Original:19.00248419.jpgAutor:Nichole Sobecki / VII / ReduxInstrucciones:Precio y/o condiciones especiales. Special price and/or conditions. Requiere autorizaciOn / Requires approval. Para la imagen en alta resoluciOn, por favor contacte con la agencia. / For the high resolution file, please contact the agencyOrigen:ReduxCopyright:2018 © Nichole Sobecki / VII / Redux / Redux / CONTACTOPie de Imagen:At Raymond Group, an Indian branded fabric and fashion retailer, workers produce suits for American department store J.C. Penny, in Hawassa, Ethiopia, on January 17, 2018. Raymond has also made samples for Banana Republic and The Gap, and hopes to begin producing for them in the future. In a country where more than three-quarters of the workforce is engaged in small-scale agriculture, Ethiopia?s emerging apparel industry is attempting to turn the corner to manufacturing ? but not without meaningful challenges. The Hawassa Industrial Park is a sign of this push: a sprawling complex housing 56 identical, hangar-size steel sheds devoted exclusively to textile production that could ultimately employ up to 60,000 people. The factories sit on land that was, until the summer of 2015, a jumble of small farms. Around 500 farmers were evicted in order to build the factory, and complain that they were lied to and paid a pittance for their land. Other abuses exist at the factories, and roughly 10 percent of Hawassa's workforce quit every month. In the long run, industrialization could improve the Ethiopian economy, but that revolution still has a long road ahead. *** Local Caption *** 19.00248419
ID:CON_01524687Referencia Original:19.00248359.jpgAutor:Nichole Sobecki / VII / ReduxInstrucciones:Precio y/o condiciones especiales. Special price and/or conditions. Requiere autorizaciOn / Requires approval. Para la imagen en alta resoluciOn, por favor contacte con la agencia. / For the high resolution file, please contact the agencyOrigen:ReduxCopyright:2018 © Nichole Sobecki / VII / Redux / Redux / CONTACTOPie de Imagen:Despite its march towards manufacturing the traditions of Hawassa, Ethiopia, remain strong. Here people gather to celebrate Timkat, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church's celebration of Jesus Christ's baptism on January 19, 2018. In a country where more than three-quarters of the workforce is engaged in small-scale agriculture, Ethiopia?s emerging apparel industry is attempting to turn the corner to manufacturing ? but not without meaningful challenges. The Hawassa Industrial Park is a sign of this push: a sprawling complex housing 56 identical, hangar-size steel sheds devoted exclusively to textile production that could ultimately employ up to 60,000 people. The factories sit on land that was, until the summer of 2015, a jumble of small farms. Around 500 farmers were evicted in order to build the factory, and complain that they were lied to and paid a pittance for their land. Other abuses exist at the factories, and roughly 10 percent of Hawassa's workforce quit every month. In the long run, industrialization could improve the Ethiopian economy, but that revolution still has a long road ahead. *** Local Caption *** 19.00248359
ID:CON_01524686Referencia Original:19.00248358.jpgAutor:Nichole Sobecki / VII / ReduxInstrucciones:Precio y/o condiciones especiales. Special price and/or conditions. Requiere autorizaciOn / Requires approval. Para la imagen en alta resoluciOn, por favor contacte con la agencia. / For the high resolution file, please contact the agencyOrigen:ReduxCopyright:2018 © Nichole Sobecki / VII / Redux / Redux / CONTACTOPie de Imagen:Despite its march towards manufacturing the traditions of Hawassa, Ethiopia, remain strong. Here people gather to celebrate Timkat, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church's celebration of Jesus Christ's baptism on January 19, 2018. In a country where more than three-quarters of the workforce is engaged in small-scale agriculture, Ethiopia?s emerging apparel industry is attempting to turn the corner to manufacturing ? but not without meaningful challenges. The Hawassa Industrial Park is a sign of this push: a sprawling complex housing 56 identical, hangar-size steel sheds devoted exclusively to textile production that could ultimately employ up to 60,000 people. The factories sit on land that was, until the summer of 2015, a jumble of small farms. Around 500 farmers were evicted in order to build the factory, and complain that they were lied to and paid a pittance for their land. Other abuses exist at the factories, and roughly 10 percent of Hawassa's workforce quit every month. In the long run, industrialization could improve the Ethiopian economy, but that revolution still has a long road ahead. *** Local Caption *** 19.00248358
ID:CON_01524685Referencia Original:19.00248356.jpgAutor:Nichole Sobecki / VII / ReduxInstrucciones:Precio y/o condiciones especiales. Special price and/or conditions. Requiere autorizaciOn / Requires approval. Para la imagen en alta resoluciOn, por favor contacte con la agencia. / For the high resolution file, please contact the agencyOrigen:ReduxCopyright:2018 © Nichole Sobecki / VII / Redux / Redux / CONTACTOPie de Imagen:Despite its march towards manufacturing the traditions of Hawassa, Ethiopia, remain strong. Here people gather to celebrate Timkat, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church's celebration of Jesus Christ's baptism on January 19, 2018. In a country where more than three-quarters of the workforce is engaged in small-scale agriculture, Ethiopia?s emerging apparel industry is attempting to turn the corner to manufacturing ? but not without meaningful challenges. The Hawassa Industrial Park is a sign of this push: a sprawling complex housing 56 identical, hangar-size steel sheds devoted exclusively to textile production that could ultimately employ up to 60,000 people. The factories sit on land that was, until the summer of 2015, a jumble of small farms. Around 500 farmers were evicted in order to build the factory, and complain that they were lied to and paid a pittance for their land. Other abuses exist at the factories, and roughly 10 percent of Hawassa's workforce quit every month. In the long run, industrialization could improve the Ethiopian economy, but that revolution still has a long road ahead. *** Local Caption *** 19.00248356